Glossary*


Internet

The Internet is the global system of interconnected computer networks that use the Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP) to link devices worldwide. It is a network of networks that consists of private, public, academic, business, and government networks of local to global scope, linked by a broad array of electronic, wireless, and optical networking technologies. The Internet carries a vast range of information resources and services, such as the inter-linked hypertext documents and applications of the World Wide Web (WWW), electronic mail, telephony, and file sharing.


The World Wide Web

The World Wide Web (abbreviated WWW or the Web) is an information space where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), interlinked by hypertext links, and accessible via the Internet.


Project:

In contemporary business and science, a project is an individual or collaborative enterprise, possibly involving research or design, that is carefully planned, usually by a project team, to achieve a particular aim.


Parameter:

A parameter (from the Ancient Greek παρά, para: "beside", "subsidiary"; and μέτρον, metron: "measure"), generally, is any characteristic that can help in defining or classifying a particular system (meaning an event, project, object, situation, etc.). That is, a parameter is an element of a system that is useful, or critical, when identifying the system, or when evaluating its performance, status, condition, etc.


1977:

1977 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1977th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 977th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1970s decade.


Common year:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation.


Intercalation:

Intercalation or embolism in timekeeping is the insertion of a leap day, week, or month into some calendar years to make the calendar follow the seasons or moon phases.


Leap day:

February 29, also known as leap day or leap year day, is a date added to most years that are divisible by 4, such as 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020, and 2024. A leap day is added in various solar calendars (calendars based on the Earth's revolution around the Sun), including the Gregorian calendar standard in most of the world. A leap day is observed because the Earth's period of orbital revolution around the Sun takes approximately 6 hours longer than 365 whole days. A leap day compensates for this lag, realigning the calendar with the Earth's position in the Solar System; otherwise, seasons would occur later than intended in the calendar year.


Month:

A month is a unit of time, used with calendars, which is approximately as long as a natural period related to the motion of the Moon; month and Moon are cognates. The traditional concept arose with the cycle of moon phases; such months (lunations) are synodic months and last approximately 29.53 days. The famous mnemonic Thirty days hath September is a common way of teaching the lengths of the months in the English-speaking world.


Time:

Time is the indefinite continued progress of existence and events that occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future. Time is a component quantity of various measurements used to sequence events, to compare the duration of events or the intervals between them, and to quantify rates of change of quantities in material reality or in the conscious experience.


Calendar:

A calendar is a system of organizing days for social, religious, commercial or administrative purposes. This is done by giving names to periods of time, typically days, weeks, months and years. A date is the designation of a single, specific day within such a system.


Mnemonic:

A mnemonic device, or memory device, is any learning technique that aids information retention or retrieval (remembering) in the human memory. Mnemonics make use of elaborative encoding, retrieval cues, and imagery as specific tools to encode any given information in a way that allows for efficient storage and retrieval.


Memory:

Memory is the faculty of the mind by which information is encoded, stored, and retrieved.


Knuckle mnemonic:

The knuckle mnemonic is a mnemonic device for remembering the number of days in the months of the Julian and Gregorian calendars.


Knuckle:

The knuckles are the joints of the fingers which are brought into prominence when the hand is clenched and a fist is made.


Joint:

A joint or articulation (or articular surface) is the connection made between bones in the body which link the skeletal system into a functional whole.

Articulation: Define: origin:
late Middle English (in the senses ‘joint’, ‘joining’): from Latin articulatio(n-), from the verb articulare
(see "articulate").
Articulate: Define: origin:
mid 16th century: from Latin articulatus, past participle of articulare ‘divide into joints, utter distinctly’, from articulus ‘small connecting part’
(see "article").
Article: Define: origin:
Middle English (denoting a separate clause of the Apostles' Creed): from Old French, from Latin articulus ‘small connecting part’, diminutive of artus ‘joint’.

Finger:

A finger is a limb of the human body and a type of digit, an organ of manipulation and sensation found in the hands of humans and other primates.


Day:

A day, a unit of time, is approximately the period of time during which the Earth completes one rotation with respect to the Sun (solar day).


Gregorian calendar:

The Gregorian calendar is internationally the most widely used civil calendar.


Earth:

Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only object in the Universe known to harbor life. Earth's axis of rotation is tilted with respect to its orbital plane, producing seasons on Earth.


Life:

Life is a characteristic that distinguishes physical entities that do have biological processes, such as signaling and self-sustaining processes, from those that do not, either because such functions have ceased, or because they never had such functions and are classified as inanimate.


Orbit:

In physics, an orbit is the gravitationally curved trajectory of an object, such as the trajectory of a planet around a star or a natural satellite around a planet.


Universe:

The Universe is all of space and time and their contents, including planets, stars, galaxies, and all other forms of matter and energy. While the spatial size of the entire Universe is still unknown, it is possible to measure the observable universe.


Space:

Space is the boundless three-dimensional extent in which objects and events have relative position and direction.


Objects:

In physics, a physical body or physical object (or simply a body or object) is an identifiable collection of matter, which may be constrained by an identifiable boundary, and may move as a unit by translation or rotation, in 3-dimensional space.


*Unless otherwise specified, all sources (other than 'define:origin:') are from Wikipedia, the free (online) encyclopedia that anyone can edit.